Science

IEEE Sensors Distinguished Lecture: Self-Powered Wearable Sensors for Health and Environmental Monitoring

Date: 

Tuesday, 3 December, 2019 -
14:00 to 15:00

Where: 

UNSW Chemical Science Building, Mezzanine Level, Room M17

Hosts: 

School of Materials Science and Engineering

Type of event: 

Seminar

Self-powered wearable sensors devices can not only increase adoption and compliance but also enable long-term and continuous monitoring of many key health and environmental parameters. In order to achieve self-powered operation, it is essential to maximize the power generated from the body and minimize the power consumed by sensors, computation, communication and power management to achieve the self-powered operation. Recent advances in nanomaterials, nanostructures, and nanodevices have increased efficiency of energy harvesters, lowered energy per computational bit, increased capacitor storage density, and enhanced nanosensor efficiency making autonomous operation realizable. In this talk, I will discuss how these advances are being combined together to build self-powered wearable sensor systems, which can enable long-term sensing and effective management of chronic conditions, sensing of personal exposure to air pollutants and toxins and provide longitudinal studies that can provide new insight into correlation of various health and environmental parameters. I will also discuss the role that data will play in making these systems effective for both the patient and the provider.

 

Biography: 

Veena Misra is the Director of the National Science Foundation Nanosystems Engineering Research Center on Advanced Self-Powered of Integrated Sensors and Technologies (ASSIST). She is a Distinguished Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at North Carolina State University and a 2012 IEEE Fellow. She is also a distinguished lecturer for IEEE Sensors. She received the B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from North Carolina State University, Raleigh. After working at the Advanced Products Research and Development Laboratories, Motorola Inc., Austin, TX she joined the faculty of North Carolina State University in 1998. She has authored or coauthored over 200 papers. Dr. Misra was the recipient of the 2001 National Science Foundation Presidential Early CAREER Award, the 2011 Alcoa Distinguished Engineering Research Award, and 2007 Outstanding Alumni Research Award and the 2016 R.J. Reynolds Award. She also served as the general chair of the 2012 IEEE International Electron Device Meeting.