Science

Vision Science/Clinical Optometry

The Bachelor of Vision Science/Optometry combines the theoretical discipline of vision science with the clinical art of primary eye care. Vision science includes the optics of lenses and instruments, the physiology of the eye, the psychophysics of vision and the neuroscience of the brain.

Optometry includes the diagnosis and management of ocular disease, the dispensing of spectacles and contact lenses, the management of people with special needs (children, low vision), sports vision and vision in the workplace. Graduates of this program will be able to register as an optometrist in Australia. The degree is also recognised in New Zealand and in most parts of Asia. Job opportunities in this field are excellent and are expected to remain excellent given the high visual demands in the modern computer-based workplace, and the ageing population in Australia.

Upon completion of the Master of Clinical Optometry degree, students will be allowed to apply for registration with the Optometry Board leading to the practice of Optometry in Australia, New Zealand and most parts of Asia.

Graduates of the dual award Bachelor of Vision Science/Master of Clinical Optometry will have specialised knowledge and skills for professional practice and research in Optometry and Vision Science and further learning.

 

In your first year, you will cover foundation sciences including chemistry, mathematics and biology.

 

Degree Structure

This program consists of a three-year Bachelor of Vision Science and a two-year Master of Clinical Optometry.

The first year courses are:

The full list of courses required for this degree are listed on the program page for 3182 Bachelor of Vision Science/Optometry  in the Online Handbook.

If you still have questions about your Vision Science/Clinical Optometry degree after reading the Online Handbook, please contact the School of Optometry and Vision Science.

After you have chosen which courses you want to take, check the online timetable to see when they're offered before enrolling via myUNSW.

 

Terminology

     
 Program   
     
   
 A program at UNSW is your degree and will have a four-digit program code (e.g. 3970 Bachelor of Science). 
   

 

     
 Major   
     
   
 A major is a defined sequence of study within a program (e.g. Bachelor of Science with a Major in Chemistry). In some programs, it's possible to do more than one major. 
   

 

     
 Courses   
     
   
 All programs and majors at UNSW are made up of courses. Courses are like subjects at school. Each course has an 8-digit course code (e.g. CHEM1011) and usually involve lectures, tutorials and labs. In Science there are 5 types of courses: 
   

 

     
   Core Courses are compulsory courses that must be taken for a program or major. 
     
 
     
   Science Electives are courses that start with the codes listed on Table 1. 
     
 
     
   Free Electives are courses that may be taken from anywhere across the university; either from Science or another Faculty. 
     
 
     
   Recommended Electives are not compulsory but are considered good complimentary courses for a program or major. 
     
 
     
   General Education Courses are courses that must be taken from outside the Faculty of Science (i.e. no courses listed on Table 1 can count as General Education). 
     

 

     
 Science Schools   
     
   
   
 Within each Faculty at UNSW are a number of schools who teach the courses in their area of expertise. In Science, there are 9 schools: 
   
 
  • Aviation
  • Biological, Earth & Environmental Sciences (BEES)
  • Biotechnology & Biomolecular Sciences (BABS)
  • Chemistry
  • Materials Science & Engineering
  • Mathematics & Statistics
  • Optometry & Vision Science
  • Physics
  • Psychology
 
   
 The School of Medical Science (which is part of the Faculty of Medicine) also teaches many courses in Science. 
   

 

     
 Units of Credit (UoC)   
     
   
 Courses, majors and programs at UNSW are measured in Units of Credit (UoC). Most courses in Science are worth 6 UoC each, and a full-time load is 18 UoC per term (i.e. 3 x courses) or 48 UoC per year (8 x courses). 
   

 

     
 Prerequisites   
     
   
 A prerequisite is a course that must be taken before you can enrol in another course. A co-requisite is a course that must be taken at the same time as another course. 
   

 

     
 Assumed Knowledge   
     
   
 Assumed Knowledge is the level of understanding you are expected to have before taking a course. Nobody will check that you have the correct level of assumed knowledge, but you will be at a disadvantage if you don't. 
   
 Bridging Courses are available to if you don’t have sufficient assumed knowledge for the course you want to take.