Science

Aviation

The Bachelor of Aviation (Flying) offers you opportunity to be educated and trained as pilots to the highest commercial standards.

In this degree, you will learn the core subjects behind aviation as well as gain your flying licence. As part of the Professional Pilot Program you will have up to 250 hours of flight training and approximately 30 hours of simulator training.

The Bachelor of Aviation (Management) allows you to pursue a career in flight operations on or off the flight deck.

The degree shares a common academic core with the flying stream, but instead of flight training you do a range of courses in areas such as Operations Management, Aviation Economics, Law and Regulations, Airline Marketing and Safety.

The Bachelor of Aviation (Management) can also be taken as a dual degree with the Bachelor of Commerce.

 

Degree Structure

All of the required courses for the two Aviation degrees are listed in the UNSW Online Handbook:

 

 

If you have any questions about your Aviation degree after reading the Online Handbook, please contact the School of Aviation.

After you have chosen which courses you want to take, check the timetable website to see when they're offered before enrolling via myUNSW.

 

Terminology

 

     
 Program   
     
   
 A program at UNSW is your degree and will have a four-digit program code (e.g. 3970 Bachelor of Science). 
   

 

     
 Major   
     
   
 A major is a defined sequence of study within a program (e.g. Bachelor of Science with a Major in Chemistry). In some programs, it's possible to do more than one major. 
   

 

     
 Courses   
     
   
 All programs and majors at UNSW are made up of courses. Courses are like subjects at school. Each course has an 8-digit course code (e.g. CHEM1011) and usually involve lectures, tutorials and labs. In Science there are 5 types of courses: 
   

 

     
   Core Courses are compulsory courses that must be taken for a program or major. 
     
 
     
   Science Electives are courses that start with the codes listed on Table 1. 
     
 
     
   Free Electives are courses that may be taken from anywhere across the university; either from Science or another Faculty. 
     
 
     
   Recommended Electives are not compulsory but are considered good complimentary courses for a program or major. 
     
 
     
   General Education Courses are courses that must be taken from outside the Faculty of Science (i.e. no courses listed on Table 1 can count as General Education). 
     

 

     
 Science Schools   
     
   
   
 Within each Faculty at UNSW are a number of schools who teach the courses in their area of expertise. In Science, there are 9 schools: 
   
 
  • Aviation
  • Biological, Earth & Environmental Sciences (BEES)
  • Biotechnology & Biomolecular Sciences (BABS)
  • Chemistry
  • Materials Science & Engineering
  • Mathematics & Statistics
  • Optometry & Vision Science
  • Physics
  • Psychology
 
   
 The School of Medical Science (which is part of the Faculty of Medicine) also teaches many courses in Science. 
   

 

     
 Units of Credit (UoC)   
     
   
 Courses, majors and programs at UNSW are measured in Units of Credit (UoC). Most courses in Science are worth 6 UoC each, and a full-time load is 24 UoC per semester (i.e. 4 x courses). 
   

 

     
 Prerequisites   
     
   
 A prerequisite is a course that must be taken before you can enrol in another course. A co-requisite is a course that must be taken at the same time as another course. 
   

 

     
 Assumed Knolwedge   
     
   
 Assumed Knowledge is the level of understanding you are expected to have before taking a course. Nobody will check that you have the correct level of assumed knowledge, but you will be at a disadvantage if you don't. 
   
 Bridging Courses are available to if you don’t have sufficient assumed knowledge for the course you want to take.